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VOICES OF EXPERIENCE

Discover stories from real patients treated with CARVYKTI and their caregivers.

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VO: This video is about a patient in a clinical trial treated with ciltacabtagene autoleucel, now known as CARVYKTI. Individual results may vary. Please see the full Important Safety Information at the end of this video and the full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide at CARVYKTI.com. Discuss any questions you have with your doctor.

VO: What is CARVYKTI (ciltacabtagene autoleucel)?

  • CARVYKTI is a treatment used for adult patients who have cancer of the bone marrow called multiple myeloma. It is used when at least four other kinds of treatment have not worked or have stopped working
  • CARVYKTI is a medicine made from your own white blood cells, which have been changed (genetically modified) to recognize and attack your multiple myeloma cells

VO: CARVYKTI may cause serious side effects which may be fatal or life-threatening including the risk of Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS), Immune Effector Cell-Associated Neurotoxicity Syndrome (ICANS), Parkinsonism and Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis/Macrophage Activation Syndrome, and prolonged cytopenias.

Due to these serious side effects CARVYKTI is only available through a restricted program, CARVYKTI REMS (Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy).

Please see the Important Safety Information in this video and read the accompanying full Prescribing Information including the Medication Guide, and talk with your doctor.

VO: Let's get acclimated to the CARVYKTI Treatment Process. Therapy with CARVYKTI is a 5 step process that generally takes about 2-3 months......
Step 1 – cell collection for 3 to 6 hours
Step 2 – genetically modifying your T cells, approximately 4 weeks * Timing and outcomes of manufacturing may vary.
Step 3- Pre-infusion treatment – 3 days
Step 4 – One-Time CARVYKTI infusion 30 to 60 minutes
Step 5 – Monitoring – 4 weeks and beyond
Individual results may vary. Let's hear from a real patient with his experience.

ROB: Hi I’m Rob. I’ve got five kids and a wonderful wife, and I’m a multiple myeloma patient.

JILL: I’m Jill, proud wife to Rob and mother to Zachary, Julia, Ethan, Jackson, and Samantha. Five wonderful children.

ROB: When you hear news like incurable cancer, your family becomes very important.

JILL: It’s the worst sucker punch that you can imagine. It’s gut-wrenching. You feel like your world is ending. You don’t know where to turn, what to do.

ROB: One of my doctors early on said the goal with multiple myeloma is to get you to the next treatment. We’re always working on new ones, and by the time we run out, hopefully there’s another one, and so far, for me, knock on wood, it’s been the case.

ROB: Basically it was three weeks or more, basically 25, 26 days in a month where it was continuously just basically a struggle to get up and get through the day. So, I’d get a few good days where you kind of almost feel normal again, and I would schedule everything around, okay, these are going to be my good days to try to get the most out of them that I could.

JILL: Well, I knew the inevitable might happen and would happen, that Rob would relapse, and eventually there would be no more chemo options. So, I looked into alternative treatments and clinical trials, and I kept reading about something called CAR-T.

ROB: My doctor told me that since I had failed three treatments, I might be eligible for CAR-T approved as CARVYKTI.

ROB: The beginning they tell you, you have to have your cells withdrawn, taken from you, and sent off to Janssen for engineering. And during that timeframe, you go through bridging therapy. And then you check into the hospital.

JILL: When the infusion is going in, lots of prayers are being sent and positive energy, but it’s almost a little anticlimactic. It’s, what is it, a 30-minute infusion, and then it’s done, and you just – that’s it? You just wait. You wait and pray.

ROB: Then the CRS kicks in. I was lucky. I only had a level-one CRS, not fun by any means. It was like three days of cycling try to maintain your temperature from getting too high. Then we had……daily check-ins to the hospital to make sure your vitals and everything were doing okay.

ROB: I recall my doctor came in and was very happy to tell me that I had had a complete response, is the way she phrased it.

ROB: I almost didn’t believe it at first, to tell you the truth.

ROB: I’m not receiving any treatments for multiple myeloma right now.

ROB: It’s just a complete different life not having to go in and – chemotherapy can be – everyone has a different reaction to it, but it can really take a toll on your body, on you mentally, and there’s none of that now.

ROB: Every patient has a different experience. Talk to your doctor to make sure your treatment is right for you.

ROB: It’s a long, hard journey, but staying positive I think is really important. Find something to focus on and strive for, and it just helps rather than – don’t give up. There’s hope out there, and there’s great people like the people at Janssen working… …to help us. And it’s – hang in there, and I wish you the best of luck.

ROB SHARES HIS JOURNEY

“My doctor told me that I might be eligible for CAR-T.”

Rob was determined to try a different potential treatment option. Then his doctor recommended he enroll in a clinical trial.

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If you've been treated with CARVYKTI—or if you are a caregiver for someone who's been treated with CARVYKTI—you can share your story so that other people can benefit from hearing about your experience.

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VO: This video is about a patient in a clinical trial treated with ciltacabtagene autoleucel, now known as CARVYKTI. Individual results may vary. Please see the full Important Safety Information at the end of this video and the full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide at CARVYKTI.com. Discuss any questions you have with your doctor.

VO: What is CARVYKTI (ciltacabtagene autoleucel)?

  • CARVYKTI is a treatment used for adult patients who have cancer of the bone marrow called multiple myeloma. It is used when at least four other kinds of treatment have not worked or have stopped working
  • CARVYKTI is a medicine made from your own white blood cells, which have been changed (genetically modified) to recognize and attack your multiple myeloma cells

VO: CARVYKTI may cause serious side effects which may be fatal or life-threatening including the risk of Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS), Immune Effector Cell-Associated Neurotoxicity Syndrome (ICANS), Parkinsonism and Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis/Macrophage Activation Syndrome, and prolonged cytopenias.

Due to these serious side effects, CARVYKTI is only available through a restricted program, CARVYKTI REMS (Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy).

Please see the Important Safety Information in this video and read the accompanying full Prescribing Information including the Medication Guide, and talk with your doctor.

VO: Let's get acclimated to the CARVYKTI Treatment Process.
Therapy with CARVYKTI is a 5 step process that generally takes about 2-3 months......
Step 1 – cell collection for 3 to 6 hours
Step 2 – genetically modifying your T cells, approximately 4 weeks * Timing and outcomes of manufacturing may vary.
Step 3- Pre-infusion treatment – 3 days
Step 4 – One-Time CARVYKTI infusion 30 to 60 minutes
Step 5 – Monitoring – 4 weeks and beyond
Individual results may vary. Let's hear from a real caregiver with her experience.

JILL: I’m Jill, proud wife to Rob and mother to Zachary, Julia, Ethan, Jackson, and Samantha. Five wonderful children.

ROB: Hi. I’m Rob. I’ve got 5 kids and a wonderful wife, and I’m a multiple myeloma patient.

JILL: Rob was experiencing a lot of back pain, and his skin coloring was off, and I kept saying to him, “We need to go for a physical. We need to go for a physical.” And Rob was actually away on a business trip, and he said, “Hon, I don’t feel well. I need for you to make me a doctor’s appointment.”

JILL: It was in January when he was finally diagnosed. He was put in the hospital for about a week before the final diagnosis was complete.

JILL: It’s the worst sucker punch that you can imagine. It’s gut-wrenching. You feel like your world is ending. You don’t know where to turn, what to do. My way was control. I needed to have control of the situation, and that’s why I constantly would read at night, read during the day.

ROB: Jill has – from the beginning – has been researching everything she can. I’ve taken more of a – there’s a problem, what’s the solution? And then I just charge ahead and do it.

JILL: It broke my heart that he had to endure this. So, what did I do? I did more research. I learned, oh, back pain. Back pain is a big part of multiple myeloma, and rib pain. So, I learned how to give proper massages. So I would say, okay Rob, we’re getting a massage table. And I’d give him his daily massage, and believe it or not, it would make me feel better giving him a massage than him actually receiving it, because it made me feel like I was actually helping him.

JILL: Well, I knew the inevitable might happen and would happen, that Rob would relapse, and eventually there would be no more chemo options. So, I looked into alternative treatments and clinical trials, and I kept reading about something called CAR-T.

ROB: My doctor told me since I had failed three types of treatment that I might be eligible for CARVYKTI.

JILL: It was not even a choice for me. Thank goodness Rob thought it was the only decision to make that made sense for our family as well.

ROB: And so far, so good. I mean it’s – I’m very happy that I did it.

JILL: Me too.

JILL: When the infusion is going in, lots of prayers are being sent and positive energy, but it’s almost a little anticlimactic. It’s, what is it, a 30-minute infusion? And then it’s done, and you just – that’s it? You just wait. You wait and pray.

ROB: During treatment, she was by my side the whole time. She was able to stay in the hospital, made a huge difference for me just knowing she was there for me always, and my family is the most important thing to me.

JILL: I was known as, quote/unquote, the wife. Oh, the wife is coming. The wife is here because I would watch every medicine that went in him, and I would ask lots of questions, and I’m sorry if I was very annoying, but to me, the only way I could get through this was having knowledge because, for me, again, it was – if I had the knowledge, I had the control of hopefully keeping him safe. I just wanted Rob safe. That was my goal. That was my role.

JILL: Rob did great, but you just have to know that there’s a good chance when you’re going in through this that you will have CRS experience. Everyone is well-versed in CRS, and they’re there to help you. That’s the main thing. You can get to the other side.

ROB: I recall my doctor came in and was very happy to tell me that I had had a complete response, is the way she phrased it.

JILL: I never doubted it. Full faith in Rob

JILL: We spend our time reading and playing games with the kids. We play a lot of cards. We walk a lot, a lot. We just fill our days with each other and with the kids. It’s so wonderful just to be, just to exist together as a family.

JILL: I’m just really so pleased that he picked me to be his partner, and I can go through this journey with him.

ROB: I wouldn’t want to take it with anyone else.

FINDING PURPOSE IN CARE

“It broke my heart that he had to endure this. So, what did I do? I did more research.”

When Jill's husband relapsed again, she sought a way to find some control. Her efforts researching and discussing other treatment options with Rob's physicians helped them find a potential new treatment option in a clinical trial.